6 Great Indian Food Walks

What do you do when you have just a few hours to discover a new city? You ditch your run-of-the-mill itinerary and let a food specialist walk you through the city’s delicacies as you soak in its cultural and historical landmarks. 

128 Food walks of India 1

128 Food walks of India 2

128 Food walks of India 3

* Published in the November 2016 issue of Spiceroute, the inflight travel magazine of Spice Jet airlines

On a tea spree

April 2015 Edition
April 2015 Edition

Reach for the spoon — A review of The Sassy Spoon

This piece appeared in the January 2015 issue of the Taj City Guide

The Sassy Spoon-Page 1The Sassy Spoon-Page 2The Sassy Spoon-Page3

Rustic charm: Birdsong Café

Wooden tables, vitrines, old chairs and retro 1970s plastic switches on teak wood bases—subtle but strong design elements
Wooden tables, vitrines, old chairs and retro 1970s plastic switches on teak wood bases—subtle but strong design elements

Samir Raut and Amit Mayekar of Studio Eight Twentythree design Birdsong Café in suburban Mumbai as a contextual response to the surrounding heritage precinct

Starting out by ensuring that the design speaks the same language as its historic neighbours, the material palette has been restricted to concrete and wood – the former, a not-so-modern material and the latter, a centuries-old one. For Samir, these materials with their enigmatic charm fascinate because of their ability to age elegantly, almost as if they are able to tell stories of the space as it ages along with them.

Head over to India Art n Design to read the entire piece, complete with gorgeous imagery of the equally gorgeous cafe.

Day 1- Between two guest houses and enough time to spare

Lush view from the lobby/chill-out space of Jati Home Stay
Lush view from the lobby/cafe of Jati Home Stay
I had read so much about Ubud and had even heard about this little town from a dear friend. And here I am, sitting at the cafe of my guesthouse, Jati Home Stay (Wi-Fi is freely available at most cafés), after a long day of walking around and, of course, the press meet for the Ubud Writers & Readers Festival 2014.

The ornately carved entrance to my room at Honeymoon Guesthouse
The ornately carved entrance to my room at Honeymoon Guesthouse
I arrived last night and was booked for a night at Honeymoon guesthouse, one of the many properties owned by the festival director Janet De Neefe. Staying in a traditional Balinese villa, although just for a night, was such a treat. I find it a bit daunting to arrive at a new destination in the dark of the night when travelling solo. I took a little walk outside and chanced upon Nick’s Pension, where I devoured a meaty club sandwich after travelling for hours from Mumbai. Yes, the adventurous side in me was dulled. But I knew I had plenty of time to sample Indonesian cuisine at its best.

Each room has a huge, ornately carved patio—something that I only noticed once I woke up. It was here that I thoroughly enjoyed a strong cup of Balinese coffee and felt much better, ready to take on the day. The rooms are clean and the bathrooms rustic, while breakfasts are as perfect as can be. I had to check that day as their rooms were already pre-booked but all went well as I would soon come to see.

I’ve been meeting many new people, mostly writers, many of whom are from Australia given its proximity to Ubud, as well as journalists from Jakarta and Bangkok. The town is a small one, so you can walk around if you have time to spare. But since I’ve to be at festival venues, some of which are over 15 minutes away, I’ve decided to take a ride every morning.

Continue reading “Day 1- Between two guest houses and enough time to spare”