Snapshot Saturdays—A traditional Kinnauri home

A carved wooden house in Sangla, Kinnaur

This photo, of a traditional Kinnauri home, was shot during the first leg of my trip to Kinnaur in the eastern part of Himachal Pradesh a few years ago. We first stopped at Sangla and then moved on to Chitkul and Kalpa (more on those towns in future posts!). While Sangla is a small town, its main market road can get very busy. So we didn’t really spend too much time there except for the few meals we devoured at the tiny restaurants serving local vegetable preparations and momos.

We prefered to walk further down the mountain that houses a tiny hamlet made up of charming houses and plum trees. Most of the houses in Sangla and other districts in lower Kinnaur are two-storeyed wooden houses with stone roofs. This technique, also known as the Kath-Kuni style, alternates layers of wood and stone for better longevity of the home.

This particular house, with its conical gabled stone roof, intricately carved walls, decorative ram skulls and a carved wooden dragon, stood out among the others. It looked much like many of the temples (Buddhism and Hinduism are practiced in tandem here) I had seen across Kinnaur. Woodwork is largely practiced in Kinnaur and the dragon motif seems to be a favourite among the locals. It’s also interesting to note that the houses here, this one included, incorporate Tibetan elements due to the proximity of Kinnaur to the Indo-Tibet border.

Snapshot Saturdays—Ranthambore’s Ancient Ruins

I like to take a break from words, sometimes. And I love to visually document stuff when I travel, try out new dishes or do something new. So I thought it might be nice to share it with you all.

This all-new section on A Delightful Space, called Snapshot Saturdays, will bring you one piece of imagery from the recent past, every Saturday. Hope you enjoy it!

This ancient stone structure is one of the many such ruins that can be found in the Ranthambore National Park

This photograph was shot in Ranthambore National Park, Sawai Madhopur in the Indian state of Rajasthan. We were on a safari trail that took us along the famed Jogi Mahal, when we came across this ancient structure.

Jogi Mahal, a guesthouse solely used by officials and dignitaries, lies in the middle of the forest! We later learnt from the owner of our guesthouse that the former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi and his family stayed here for a few days in 1986. In fact, it was the first real break that he took since assuming the office of PM. Indian film actor Amitabh Bachchan and his wife, Jaya was also invited to Jogi Mahal at the time. Word has it that Mr Bachchan even sang a song after the then PM requested him to do so.

While I don’t have a picture of Jogi Mahal (you’ll be able to find a lot of them online), here is some information about these stone ruins that can be found on way to the Jogi Mahal gate of the national park that plays home to around around 60 tigers at present. You’ll find a number of such ruins as this, each one different from the other.

There are so many ruins in Ranthambore because the national park houses the ancient Ranthambore Fort, a World Heritage Site. Before Indian became an independent state in 1947, the Maharajas of Jaipur, who often used the Ranthambore National Park as their hunting grounds, inhabited this 700-feet-high fort. But before that, the fort was associated with Jainism during the reign of Prithviraj I of Chauhan during the 12th Century CE. The Nagil Jat clan built this  fort two centuries before this.

Besides being excited at the prospect of seeing a tiger or two (which didn’t happen, by the way), it was amazing to spend a few hours in the lush and paradisiacal national park with its ancient ruins and fort that still stand strong.

The Liebster Award for Blogging

Liebster AwardI woke up to a sweet little surprise yesterday. Smriti from Mumbai Mornings nominated me for the Liebster Award. This award, which is circulated on the Internet among the blogging community, is a lovely way for bloggers and readers to get to know each other a little better. I remember reading about this award when I had finally decided to be more of an active blogger last year. I also remember thinking to myself about the rare possibility of some generous and motivating blogger stopping by my blog to nominate me. At the time, I was, perhaps, only three blog posts down, and winning this award seemed unimaginable.

And then, in an instant, I almost forgot about this award. Until today, that is. I’m so excited to have received it (Thanks Smriti!) because it’s very encouraging to know that you have readers out there who enjoy reading your work. So just in case you aren’t in the know, the Liebster award is given to bloggers who have less than 200 followers. I think it’s a great initiative to help expand your blog network, to discover new bloggers and to reach out to new readers. Who doesn’t love awards, really! Besides, Liebster means sweetest, kindest, lovely, cute, endearing and valued, among other pleasant things in German.

But there are some rules and they are not too difficult to follow. Here they are:

1. You have to link back to the person that nominated you.
2. You must answer all 11 questions given to you by the person who nominated you.
3. After completing these questions you must nominate 11 bloggers with under 200 followers and give them 11 questions of your choice.
4. You must not nominate the person who nominated you.
5. You must let your nominees know that they have been nominated and provide a link for them to your post so that they can learn about it.

Now, here are my answers to the questions sent in by Smriti from Mumbai Mornings who had nominated me: Continue reading “The Liebster Award for Blogging”