Of skyscrapers and sandcastles

A browse through Renzo Piano’s project list proves just how versatile an architect he is. From the Centre Georges Pompidou and the New York Times building, to the Shard in London, the Pritzker Prize-winnign architect continues to draw praise for his timeless architecture.

In an intriguing piece published on the Guardian a few days ago, the Italian architect says that has been making sandcastles for a long time. Building sandcastles reminds me of my childhood. But that’s not to say that you won’t find me building them any longer! I suggest you head over to The Guardian and give it a read because Piano has shared some tips on how to perfect your sandcastle.

Below, is a piece I had written for the Design special of Signé, a luxury lifestyle magazine published in Dubai. Click on the image to read the piece.
Renzo Piano

Creative Coalescence

A mural created by artist Anpu Varkey reflects the underground nature of the premises while drawing a parallel with characteristics like collective intelligence and shared work best epitomised by an ant (Anagram Office © andré j fanthome)
A mural created by artist Anpu Varkey reflects the underground nature of the premises while drawing a parallel with characteristics like collective intelligence and shared work best epitomised by an ant (Anagram Office © andré j fanthome)

Anagram Architects’ new studio promotes collaboration and creativity via symbolic design in an open-plan layout

New Delhi-based Anagram Architects – a spatial design consultancy, is known to deliver innovative, context-specific designs that encourage sustainable lifestyles. Naturally, when it came to its own office, in South Delhi’s creative Hauz Khas pocket, the team didn’t have tolook any further than its own design philosophy for inspiration.

The 12481 sq. ft. office accommodates the firm’s expanded team through the interplay of standout features that include the play of light and an open-plan layout. Pops of lime green add vibrancy amid a light palette of wooden tones and whites. Continue reading “Creative Coalescence”

Rustic charm: Birdsong Café

Wooden tables, vitrines, old chairs and retro 1970s plastic switches on teak wood bases—subtle but strong design elements
Wooden tables, vitrines, old chairs and retro 1970s plastic switches on teak wood bases—subtle but strong design elements

Samir Raut and Amit Mayekar of Studio Eight Twentythree design Birdsong Café in suburban Mumbai as a contextual response to the surrounding heritage precinct

Starting out by ensuring that the design speaks the same language as its historic neighbours, the material palette has been restricted to concrete and wood – the former, a not-so-modern material and the latter, a centuries-old one. For Samir, these materials with their enigmatic charm fascinate because of their ability to age elegantly, almost as if they are able to tell stories of the space as it ages along with them.

Head over to India Art n Design to read the entire piece, complete with gorgeous imagery of the equally gorgeous cafe.

The queen of diamonds: Varuna D Jani

Varuna D Jani at work

Bedazzling jewellery, a big heart and flamboyance best sum up the queen of diamonds, Varuna D Jani

Varuna D Jani’s life seems to have unfolded exactly as she might have envisioned it. Part of her life philosophy is the belief that every woman is born with a Midas touch that allows her to move mountains and to fly high. The Mumbai-based jewellery designer is, undoubtedly one of India’s best, having transformed what was once a passion into a career.

Jani, who was born into a family of jewellers of Popley Eternal Fame, remembers designing jewellery for fun when she was just eight. But it was only when she returned from Dubai in 2006 to take care of the family business that the Mumbai-based designer realised that jewellery was her passion. It was also around this time that she started to design her own line of wearable wedding jewellery based on the sheer lack of it at the time. Since then, there was no looking back.

Head over to India Art n Design to read about everything that this jewellery designer adores, from her style essentials to her style icons. Continue reading “The queen of diamonds: Varuna D Jani”

Time to get back to the blog

October was a busy month. I was sad to have left Ubud, but on returning to the fast, grimy city of Mumbai, it wasn’t so bad! I was excited and so motivated to dive right back into writing for magazines and digital publications. And, with it, came the deadlines that every writer is so familiar with. With no time to blog, I found myself thinking about A Delightful Space ever so often! I have so much to share about my trip to Ubud. So keep a look out for some travel posts in the near future. Until then, here’s a little something I had written for The Label, a lifestyle magazine produced by Louise Philippe.

The Get Together speaker by The House of Marley, a portable speaker for the eco-conscious audiophile

Portable speakers are all over the place right now. However, there are but a few portable audio devices that are actually worthy of your cochlea, and thereby, your money. Yes, the portable speaker scene stands on shaky ground. But like a handful of others, the Get Together speaker system from The House of Marley seems to be a pleaser in the cacophonous crowd.

Sustainably crafted
The House of Marley is an eco-conscious audio company that pairs sustainable design with functionality. Co-founded by Rohan Marley, son of the legendary reggae musician Bob Marley, this earth-friendly company is just one of the 40-something entrepreneur’s many green businesses inspired by his late father’s ideals.
The Get Together Bluetooth Audio System stays true to the House of Marley’s philosophy. It sports a sustainably sourced natural bamboo façade on the front and rear. The brand’s signature Rewind fabric, made from recycled plastic bottles, reclaimed hemp and organic cotton, forms the rugged fabric enclosure for the speaker’s bass-reflex. Continue reading “Time to get back to the blog”

Q&A: Stefan Sagmeister

Sagmeister by John Madere
Sagmeister by John Madere

I had the chance to meet and interview the noted graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister last year, when I attended the Ink Talks series of talks and discussions that present breakthrough ideas and stories. Sagmeister calls a spade a spade, and it is, perhaps, this among other traits that has landed him projects with musical greats like The Rolling Stones. Here’s the story, in part.

The award-winning graphic designer on big-breasted female astronauts being a favorite cover art motif with bands and musicians continuing to struggle to make a living

How does award-winning graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister soup up a lecture on design? He gets an intern to knife him. To be specific, he had lines from his speech carved onto his skin with an X-acto knife. Known for his radical design, Sagmeister has worked with the likes of The Rolling Stones, Lou Reed and some of the biggest names in rock ’n roll history. The Austrian-born New York-based designer won two Grammys—the first for Talking Heads’ Once In A Lifetime and the second for David Byrne and Brian Eno’s Everything That Happens Will Happen Today. 

The article on Stefan Sagmeister was first published on ROLLING STONE India. Read the entire interview with Stefan Sagmeister here, on the ROLLING STONE India website.